Tim Boucher

Questionable content, possibly linked

Category: Research (Page 2 of 4)

2011 Russian anti-election fraud protests

From Wikipedia, current as of November 2017:

“On the first days following the election, Putin and United Russia were supported by rallies of the youth organisations Nashi and Young Guard.”

2011 election, same source:

“According to RIA Novosti, there were more than 1,100 official reports of election irregularities across the country, including allegations of vote fraud, obstruction of observers and illegal campaigning.[16]”

… “On 4 February 2012 the Investigation Committee of the Office of the Prosecutor General of the Russian Federation announced that the majority of videos allegedly showing falsifications at polling stations were in fact falsified and originally distributed from a single server in California, and the investigation on that started.[30]”

And of course its ironic that Putin at this time (and since) actively claims the US is doing to Russia what the US says Russia is doing to them (and perhaps both are right).

According to Putin the legitimate grievances of this young and active element of Russian society are being exploited by opportunistic elements which seek to destabilize Russia.[34]

… “Alexey Navalny, a top blogger and anti-corruption activist who branded Putin’s United Russia party as the “party of crooks and thieves”, is credited with initial mobilization of mass protests through postings on his LiveJournal blog and Twitter account. Navalny’s agitation was denounced by United Russia as “typical dirty self-promotion” and a profane tweet describing Navalny as a sheep engaged in oral sex originated from Medvedev’s Twitter account.[40][41]”

Medvedev’s famous Twitter account, which was later hacked.

Nashi:

‘Many pro-government supporters, including the pro-Putin youth group Nashi, were mobilized on 6 December at the site of the planned demonstration where they made noise in support of the government and United Russia.[42] There was a 15,000-strong rally of Nashi on Manezhnaya Square[43] and an 8,000-strong rally of the Young Guard on Revolution Square.[44] ‘

… “Twitter users in Russia have reported being overwhelmed by pro-government tweets timed to Bolotnaya Square protest-related tweets.[180] Many tweets seem to have been sent by hijacked computers, though the perpetrator(s) are not yet known.[180]”

BBC March 2012:

“”These bots succeeded in blocking the actual message feed with that hashtag,” he wrote.

The rate at which pro-government messages were posted, about 10 per second, suggests they were being done automatically rather than by individuals, said Mr Goncharov.”

What I’m calling “stream dominance” – signal jamming and replacement during high-sensitivity events.

That article links out to a December 2011 krebsonsecurity.com article:

“A review of the 2,000 Twitter accounts linked above indicates that most of them were created at the beginning of July 2011, and have very few tweets other than those meant to counter the protesters, or to simply fill the hashtag feeds with meaningless garbage. Some of the bot messages include completely unrelated hashtags or keywords, seemingly to pollute the news stream for the protester hashtags.”

TrendMicro article about the botnet, from December 2011:

“On December 6 2011, a number of pro-Kremlin activists launched an attack on Twitter using bots which posted messages with a hashtag #триумфальная (Triumfalnaya). These bots posted a range of national slogans and crude language. With a rate of up to 10 messages per second, these bots succeeded in blocking the actual message feed with that hashtag.”

Includes a short list of possible bot accounts involved.

NY Times, December 2011 article about counter-protests:

“But attendance at the party’s demonstration was sparse, not enough to fill part of the modest square designated for the event, and not even close to the 25,000 people the authorities later said attended. Moreover, many of the attendees seemed to have been taken there against their will.”

VKontakte (VK), Wikipedia:

“Founder Pavel Durov was dismissed as CEO in April 2014 after he had failed to retract a (according to himself) prank April fools letter of resignation.[20] Durov then claimed the company had been effectively taken over by Vladimir Putin’s allies[20][25][68] and suggested his ousting was the result of his refusal to hand over personal details of users to the Russian Federal Security Service and his refusal to shut down a VK group dedicated to anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny.[20][25]”

Supported by BBC March 2012 reporting:

“The Russian government has also taken steps to tackle the protests by asking the VKontakte social network to block chatter among activists.

VKontakte was contacted by Russia’s Federal Security Service and was asked to shut down groups in which some wanted to turn the protests violent.

The site said it would be unfair to block entire groups but said it would cut off individual members who incited violence.

Pavel Durov, founder of VKontakte, said the site was “100% apolitical” and did not support those in power or the opposition.”

Archived WSJ article on the FSB request.

 

Russian internet crackdown after 2011 protests

My current operating theory goes something like this, vis-a-vis Russia.

  1. Internet crackdowns followed popular anti-corruption protests
  2. Youth movements were organized/re-directed to support pro-statist agenda.
  3. Those movements perfected techniques to astro-turf and manipulate media locally, and exported their techniques to Europe and United States.
  4. Internet Research Agency, and friends, are examples of organizational models to perpetuate those techniques and missions abroad.
  5. IRA infitrated social movements and social media in US using same combination of tools.
  6. Somehow “coincidentally” these IRA et al efforts dovetailed perfectly with a certain presidential campaign environment.

Further notes:

2011.

Quoting from a Slate December 2016 article:

“But 2011 began with the Arab Spring chasing out the rulers of Tunisia and Egypt, and ended with Moscow’s middle classes taking to the streets in Facebook-organized protests against electoral corruption. Facebook did more than just make it easier to organize; in a year of popular revolution, it let some Russians feel they were part of something bigger, that they had a chance. It was a profound shock to Putin’s government.”

… “Opposition websites were hit with powerful and coordinated distributed denial of service attacks, trolling, and disinformation. Deluged with pro-government propaganda, local news platforms basically gave up trying to separate fact from political fiction. The sheer volume of fake news, plus its sophistication, meant algorithms could no longer tell the difference.”

January 2011 Telegraph article about the state of the Russian internet.

Wikipedia Internet in Russia article:

“In September 2011 Russia overtook Germany on the European market with the highest number of unique visitors online.[2] In March 2013 a survey found that Russian had become the second most commonly used language on the web.[3] “

2012:

Same Slate source as above:

… “In 2012, new censorship measures were brought in, using technologies that indiscriminately block addresses and inspect each packet of data.”

Wikipedia Internet Censorship in Russia article:

“Since 2012, Russia maintains a centralized internet blacklist (known as the “single register”) maintained by the Federal Service for Supervision of Communications, Information Technology and Mass Media (Roskomnadzor). The list is used for the censorship of individual URLs, domain names, and IP addresses. It was originally introduced to block sites that contain materials advocating drug abuse and drug production, descriptions of suicide methods, and containing child pornography. It was subsequently amended to allow the blocking of materials that are classified as extremist, call for illegal meetings, or contain other content deemed illegal.[1]”

… “Internet service providers (ISPs) are held legally responsible for any illegal content that is accessible to their users (intermediary liability).[8]”

… “A ban on all software and websites related to circumventing internet filtering in Russia, including VPN software, anonymizers, and instructions on how to circumvent government website blocking, was passed in 2017.[21]”

… “Russia’s System of Operational-Investigatory Measures (SORM) requires telecommunications operators to install hardware provided by the Federal Security Service (FSB). It allow the agency to unilaterally monitor users’ communications metadata and content, including phone calls, email traffic and web browsing activity.[8] Metadata can be obtained without a warrant.[8] In 2014, the system was expanded to include social media platforms, and the Ministry of Communications ordered companies to install new equipment with Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) capability.[24]”

… “As of January 2018, companies registered in Russia as “organizers of information dissemination”, such as online messaging applications, will not be permitted to allow unidentified users.[29]”

Navalny, 2014, same Wikipedia source:

“In March 2014, in the midst of the Crimean crisis, the LiveJournal blog of Alexei Navalny, Kasparov.ru and Grani.ru were blocked by the government. These sites, which opposed the Russian government, were blocked for “making calls for unlawful activity and participation in mass events held with breaches of public order.”[68]”

SORM Wikipedia page:

“In August 2014, SORM-2 usage was extended to monitoring of social networks, chats and forums, requiring their operators to install SORM probes in their networks.[5][6]”

… “The SORM device recommended by the FSB is named Omega.[10] Equipment by Cellebrite appears to be in use.[11] SORM also enables the use of mobile control points, a laptop that can be plugged directly into communication hubs and immediately intercept and record the operator’s traffic.[3]”

… “Since 2010, intelligence officers can wiretap someone’s phones or monitor their Internet activity based on received reports that an individual is preparing to commit a crime. They do not have to back up those allegations with formal criminal charges against the suspect.[15] According to a 2011 ruling, intelligence officers have the right to conduct surveillance of anyone who they claim is preparing to call for “extremist activity.”[15]”

 

Camp Seliger / Seliger Forum

Wth is Camp Seliger, and how does it fit into this Internet Research Agency mess?

Novaya Gazeta, September 2013 (auto-translated):

“In 2013, Soskovets’s “North-West Service Agency” won 18 contests for the organization of holidays, forums and sports events for St. Petersburg authorities. In half of the competitions the agency participated alone. In the summer of 2013, the contest for transport services for participants of the camp “Seliger” won.”

Very unsure about reliability of masterandmargarita.eu as a source of information, but they too talk about Camp Seliger:

“Companies like Internet Research Agency often recruit their – mostly young – employees at the so-called Seliger Camp. That’s an annual gathering of young people at Lake Seliger, about 350 km from Moscow, with a strong brainwashing character.”

LA Times, August 2011:

“In this sprawling Kremlin-sponsored youth camp 220 miles northwest of Moscow — 99 acres of white sand, tall pines and Lake Seliger, a jewel of Russian nature — thousands of young men and women are learning how to be supporters of the ruling United Russia party, future politicians and senior government officials.

The state spends more than $7 million to accommodate about 20,000 18- to 25-year-olds at the camp, known as Seliger Forum-2011. They come in groups of 7,000 for nine days in July, most of them from Kremlin-nurtured youth organizations such as Nashi (Ours), Mestnyie (Locals) and Stal (Steel).

… “”These young people are taught to open up accounts in all social networks, make as many friends as possible and thus spread information with maximum efficiency,” explained Vasily Yakemenko, founder of the Nashi youth group and head of the Federal Agency for Youth Affairs that runs the camp.”

Also unsure about reliability of opendemocracy.net domain as information source, but they talk about Seliger here (May 2014). Interesting as a first-hand account anyway.

Another opendemocracy.net article from May 2014 says similar things to what we’ve heard already (may be re-print?):

“But the Internet Research Agency has other links as well as Concord Catering. Kirill Skladovich, financial director of the Agency, is a former leader of the youth parliament of St Petersburg; one of the Agency directors, Aleksei Soskovets, keeps in close touch with Vladimir Putin, the St Petersburg City Administration and the Committee for Youth Policy. His company North-Western Services Agency won 17 tenders for providing services for the St Petersburg authorities. One of these was for the transportation of participants to the youth camp Seliger, which has always been considered a platform for the pro-Kremlin movement Nashi.

In discussion with a correspondent, Soskovets confirmed that employees working on the internet use the methods of Nashi.”

More on Soskovets’ North-West Service Agency.

 

Livejournal & the Russian government

Very interesting podcast about Livejournal community blogging platform’s descent into basically a Russian-state-run organization. June 2017.

The Wikipedia page is pretty amazing for Livejournal, current to November 2017:

“On April 4, 2017, LiveJournal significantly modified its terms of use, making the service subject to Russian law. The new terms prohibit users from posting “advertising and/or political solicitation materials”, or performing any actions that are “contradictory to the laws of the Russian Federation”. The terms also state that users are subject to Article 10.2 of the Federal Act of the Russian Federation No. 149, which dictates that blogs with more than 3000 daily visitors are classified as media outlets and may not be published anonymously, are responsible for the dissemination of unverified information, and are restricted from posting pornography, obscene language, or “extremist materials”.[107][108][109] “

Google to de-rank Sputnik and RT

Guardian, November 2017.

“According to Motherboard, which first reported Schmidt’s comments, he claimed the Russian disinformation strategy was easy to combat, since it is based on “amplification around a message” of information that is “repetitive, exploitative, false, [or] likely to have been weaponised”.

“My own view is that these patterns can be detected, and that they can be taken down or deprioritised.””

Like to see how they do that. I was a little annoyed with the Senate/House hearings which seemed to sort of gloss over Google’s massive role of collating and enabling access to information…

Motherboard, November 2017 coverage:

“Both outlets are wholly owned by the Russian government. RT is the overseas television station and online outlet, while Sputnik, the online-only media network, is available in over 30 languages.”

I guess in October of this year, Google pulled RT from it’s Youtube premium option, and around the same time Twitter offboarded both as advertisers.

Dmitri Medvedev – Russian Prime Minister

Dmitri Medvedev (Wikipedia) – Russian Prime Minister

“In August 2014, Anonymous International released archives from three different email accounts allegedly belonging to Dmitri Medvedev, as well as correspondence from Duma deputy and United Russia member Robert Shlegel about an organized “troll” attack on the websites of major American and British news media (including The New York Times, CNN, the BBC, USA Today, and The Huffington Post).”

Original source of above quote: Meduza 2015

Seems like Anonymous International is the English-language name for Shaltai Boltai (Humpty Dumpty), which is the source of the above leaks.

National Post, October 2016:

“A group known as Anonymous International or Shaltai-Boltai has revealed, time after time, e-mails and other confidential documents from the domestic policy department of President Vladimir Putin’s administration, as well as those belonging to ministers and aides to Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev and Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin.”

August 2014 Guardian reporting of Medvedev Twitter hack.

Buzzfeed June 2014:

“Dmitry Medvedev, Putin’s protégé who was president from 2008–12, made a show of embracing social media, but it never sat well with officials and Putin supporters. The gulf between Medvedev’s transparency drive and Russia’s Byzantine bureaucracy’s reluctance to change only highlighted his impotence, earning him the nickname “Microblogger” for his small stature.”

Moscow Information Technologies

Source: Meduza 2015 article:

“Later that fall, the group leaked emails between government-affiliated company Moscow Information Technologies and various Russian media outlets about the publication of planted stories, in addition to emails allegedly belonging to First Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov. “

Moscow Times, May 2016:

“An outfit called Moscow Information Technologies, or MIT (set up by Sobyanin’s predecessor, former Mayor Yuri Luzhkov), is officially tasked with “providing informational support for the city’s projects.”

But a more honest explanation of MIT’s activities is that it serves as a vehicle for subversive propaganda on the city’s behalf.

A series of stolen emails released by the hacker group “Shaltai Boltai” (whose members the Federal Security Service arrested earlier this year) shows that MIT was involved in a clandestine program to conspire with the Russian media by running articles discrediting opposition candidates in local elections. This effort included fabricating evidence against opposition activists and suppressing unwanted coverage — a clear violation of Russian media laws.”

… “According to the organization’s leaked ledgers, MIT used to funnel up to a million rubles ($17,000) from the mayor’s office for a single newspaper story that either praised City Hall or smeared its opponents. Media outlets published these stories with phony bylines, disguising the fact that this content was essentially a paid advertisement.

The mayor’s office also manipulates the media for favorable coverage through other, more legally sound but still surreptitious means. On top of maintaining a legitimate media empire funded to the tune of 13 billion rubles a year ($230 million) that includes several TV channels, radio stations, and online news websites, Sobyanin’s administration heavily invests in swaying the agenda on Yandex.News, Russia’s biggest online news aggregator.”

… “MIT plays a role here, too. An investigation by the independent news outlet RBC showed that Moscow’s authorities have found a way to dominate the news agenda when it wants, drowning out unfavorable stories with its own.

MIT devised a scheme wherein Moscow’s neighborhood councils (most of them totally loyal to the mayor and to United Russia) set up dozens of similar news websites that are capable of firing off volleys of nearly identical news articles promoting the mayor’s initiatives. This onslaught fools Yandex’s algorithm into thinking that something important is happening. The news aggregator doesn’t differentiate between the sources, and thus assumes there’s a news event that deserves top billing in its ranking system, if hundreds of different outlets are reporting on a single event.”

Reddit user “eye_josh” Russian accounts list

Still uncertain what criteria were used to build this list, but it came out prior to the “official” famous Twitter House Democrats ‘exhibit B’ list, so seems worth documenting here. From Reddit user eye_josh, an October 2017 supposed Russian accounts list, across services.

Savchuk Leak Username List (Internet Research Agency)

This is an interesting document I turned up from ~2015 (though document itself is undated). Appears to be a spreadsheet bearing a list of usernames associated with Internet Research Agency, courtesy of the Savchuk leaks. (Google Drive link)

Found via this March 2015 mr7.ru article (in Russian). There are a number of English-language articles which confirm a couple usernames from this list.

Here is my extracted, de-duped version of this username list:

mazurov_89
braille_teeth
koka-kola23
lipyf837
vince-crane
ya_karnavalova
nannik-dr
Rezites
konorlaoo04
qkempek
caradoxee5
ynuka
natalex84
anna_02051990
mrokiralex
annetjohnson
rghkride
gkohio
karber861
innyla92
cotedo
Smurfetka-24
raikbowee1
ohvis134
demouu1
nofk452
alexander7171
vadro
makgxiewua
mofan926
smspudilj
varkhotel
shtots
rijbc
wylwurwolv
workroman
pheyeroo57
tritonst
milka_e20
codirips814
lorislaley
eekim81
oftibar
elegmhehov
aple_at_the_tab
Nikolaabil
hey_son1c
firyupa
asus
Symatvei
xamit251
farpodmuu07
oloviit
diuu085
alenkujl
rcrimsot
snoop83
vynal
sportto
danybody
alexmosyan
poragpalkhe
sergalyev839
vadim_spx
rus-policy
wafyy248
katerina2703
dragon_uz
Winter-kinder
Pjobynrutri
green_margo
ptirenw
pastogross
igerenbart
mskilys
pantyyy08
thepicard
igtego
paqurni
emory6townsend
aspera76
zymecs
001usa
ca119idia
fadaqpm
pybden
Protsyon
phidiwp507
makabu
osobroim
yuliya_korshyn
Parabellum50
policyrus
tuyqer898
aljin
rammathets
overtimorouq
ntnwoc
stranamasterov
ktoroj14
Yohohoguy
pbijipsfem
wyazfunovv
ariol921
mariya-789
roavrumper
kyxapka
ryypaulinm
jang033
wwwevgemie
p01t11
pohezvitie
zhakim755
Asswalker
vvp2014
to12scorta
Spicemachine
nastia642
nungsorivat
homyr657e
orlenrenosr
kalininkhu
parydaq070
enot_kot
abfyr890
vamiqyy63
evgenyashm
palfemine
tay-zakulisnay1
radbec
revivaldude
cykularj
ageev013
porkimes
owwaxde082
andrei-kovrin
pasioda
fooqbal951
nugotvapi
swull786
nina_istomina
gig180
raokabea
synbmulty
beloham848
lissa-marioko
kater971
peflirz
hikonozauu00
michael_jd
uglycoyotespb
urajr
bobzan
peulgieness
scavamerzl
levyshkinr
pavetbrer
ddanii33
goodrus
supersonicwall
mannaliobrit
pierii01
panbiran
georgi-grusha
pashka208
vmoffee179
etopiterdetka99
jenyamelika
anya_rocket
snowy_trail
malkovich_i
samiyymniy
chadimi
kvazarion
Nestero85
nika_anisina
savoiyar
oksadoxa
mercynt
vehofunzi
qitsen
raphahunthig
panebcaj
tergparriotio
lihohor
sojaan884
cypetcompbis
destforkowoo
nouglysv
petraffilya
Backlashealthma
amenem
paintbellu
iugegeizh
pexirgarnez
chicocali
pexirub
kmfemovmpxxx
lojtautome
inkiptiruc
palecefaz
hhlayz
ningcotedin
olginarkew
renfidebun
portlandam
olga_lebedyan
andriudruz
unmolarlay
repaw968
stepalexos
prasingyy55
steltertheeness
spinrarata
ddesesexla
antaauu4
wihhie917
pagkagezmeat
werhellvolkfu
tiopretytcur
aladorzam
nyntynuriu
begtotenlu
abezhiu
oxyitt
rabrukywiz
snowdidsmomuds
paradana
durenhuntpi
sixfeevae
nebozuanrou
procomdn
kovikotuss
urigcon211
peosaytranos
borgperwensgod
rhealaltrades
nishihatu
asafasngut
cophetycoo
merzasarsgepf
promvogtsigold
pesina20k
vuhyzowi
skewerilgraph
wladmancornnes
feedpecosleft
prosorouqu
frantirigesch
cirgadisla
precalacov
zlavaq037
hrilepswia
szehdes
bestthecalpa
lasorpprogso
classatopos
zipkingfilci
preaphoubowo
geoversive
gingsenpirem
tes40uvir
judj747
throwenelan
sfouninmire
diotradconpe
llanpaclaive
neytilmigers
glyzitneko
metcentlighrou
bentakiffo
pqalongese
chaicoffskaya
cenhoufimou
siohuntired
feascoacoca
prozaet
inga
glycmamortga
imclasfulte
izorylie646
lighwinsbrachig
mafomeri
oryanhuazo
kfuu0
daytrolchildcha
odassaflot
tamred1
paca979
vollatasklu
legahedddis
othoee111
trugleyscorun
ybdocegesch
rpmuntar
nahezuu91
socompdanfi
beadeadsdentfi
pia986
pzsg
pdachee
paschig
plimtintaza
ptimenalhook
Ladushki2014
photographereye
balyk2014
polza1985
polina_i_liza
gymbreaker
strelach
tolstunovich
demosfen-ru
Ikehujaik
nersis
IvanichKem
BVDfan
bookworm-war
nina_zlova
wwarfare
valkavakatrin
sasha-bobrov
nevzorovich
ulyanovlenin
other_vlad
devindowns8733
dgksson
tereshkova-2603
alex_solnce80
lana_rey
rafaelee661
nyanwarcat
dagdarim
Valkyrie_by
duh_matreny
lilekootherd
vlasom
Delanaya
Dianardana
art-noita
olga-safronova
007margaret
finade
mulziluu66
alexmonc
denanis
ole-kim
kebucha717
kristidom
pekrunonv
semsenya
atormentarse
princitalo
wex874
lulzgenerator
krasen_glaz
streamteamteam
alla-semenova
uruk_65
italian_women89
svetlyachok4
svetlana-cat5
lady-chizhowa
ligon-vas
zoyabela
situde
helen-jir
moilefer
vasyy234
kiselevden_blog
sulfiniya
sandra-1106
dfgnuvlnx
nopoo909
davl90
eka-ekaa
vlada-dmit
dagdarius
odinwarrior
yacotedo
dio64
faddat
lancelotitys
princehguu1
zecfivb
deniz_1983
dagdawyn
daikus
nikogu
amaranta_mara
alina_rusak
fatburner83
oorsuda
lucky_chacky86
rynv8111
alexisaa08
volyjarski
nickmenz30
diahoo7
zikolaysem
оrmely
sergvlal163
neto45u
dirtymovie1488
pussy-k1ll
slowmotion21
kassianna
antojiure
lucky159357
vmeanve
pastok879
catdogi
glen555
rajez818
nakee24
annlutaeva
bunvik
brucerivas2554
msblanshet
baronuu17
avtobaba
darkside1980
lotri85
sestrieri
neokant
hero346
Gonzoo1234
kasper
dalbine
what_1s_love
dalalbine
dordin
dorilak
juleyxom
grigadiwn
dolhala
Wwrattiveby
freud_knew
asarol997
zymbo867
lika-nonstop
masha-foxx
fegerigh
darkangel969
nmrodianodo
polinanoza
bahediraa3
joker0-0
notnoise
ogengeyy5
fastfoodformind
blabri
skim029
layerenaw
envi1
mary_mary_cherr
alberwish
voiceinourmind
patriotrusha
sortavala_city
jezmhkonda
cickjroy
oleg-welt
dujinn
pacgovsko
akira-001
dulabar
dracon36
dianarius
prokesters
arpeich
pyhanaa73
drelantrius
belle12386
bagrat12
diadem159
nastya_maks
dlinyi
amourencia
denezhky
beaumo3
moe-mnenue
drelagra
manjonga
evgenpetrova
irinavlasovaa
doukus
gensil17
ms-margo-ritta
vinni_pukh_75
dobrynich
aubah
darisar
darkpick
leon1110
vovchik1223
rapitangnyy
sniisoo00
elibrium-25
adrastea-14
freemango
venari_amores
pavulshysh
repso471
yanovskiman
nnjhid
dirtydoctor666
purablehatt
qarag316
papavear69
nmmasidmah
rroevt0611
mollyrrite
niclak007
fsplwolie
dazdaperma2014
zrvdancek
mreqii92
noxaii9
rbfen
asbojxes
alexxkx864
borodalopotoy
qaz_10
feofan_mazepa
izbulmugib
ealtaxliosnic
hyrdrowsjunkri
foggynous
noisecontroller
carbvn
rikfonoll
nicdsrez856
emily0701
vlkiril27
karelinan1
georgivanov198
elamelac
ofwicefusn
ilijpetrov
rarke
fpnvct
muzhenyok
khhundgt
ynw55
psuudocela
xysho9210
ominh
markradz
klimenb
maratgig
mixapetr10
ivanlaptev83
vaster86
miss_666
kaprizulka13
shpilka69a
plus-power
grand-blog
world_war_04
Dmrt85
veterkostya
oleggga
MOMOWOODSLI
ceabvafigi
vernpedosig
ofrner865
nepgnipr
ElijahFox
twisacaqtio
diomoslyarel
telllowchenfhig
wisdomofluck
dirtyramir
alex_razin
alecrikort
jgizet
aleks-sis
vepoqinfidal
potylio
tkachuuz
shafll
eklimiwki
domic95
rhdmitra
mrohulgatu
wallmicherwhitt
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“Organizers of the banquet” (IRA)

From mr7.ru, March 2015 (Google auto-translate from Russian):

“LLC “Internet Research” (TIN 7813585038) was founded in March 2014. The company acts as the successor to LLC “Internet Research Agency” (INN 7805627478), which was based in Olgino. The legal address of “Internet research”, according to commercial registers, is Bolshaya Raznochinnaya street, 17, room 1-N. The founder and general director is Michael Bystrov born in 1958, retired colonel of militia, former chief of the Ministry of Internal Affairs in Moscow district of St. Petersburg. According to Kommersant , in the 1990s, Mikhail Ivanovich stood at the origins of the Regional Office for Combating Organized Crime.

The company is allegedly financed by the Concord holding company (food production, restaurants, real estate, development) headed by the friend and cook of the Russian president Yevgeny Prigozhin. Since 2000, the holding company has been organizing banquets in the Kremlin, has also been cooperating with JSC Voentorg and the Ministry of Defense.”

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