?️ Emoji Investigator ™

questionable content, possibly linked ? ? ?

Category: Link (Page 1 of 3)

Random object generator

Generate a list of random things.

Data selfie

This looks pretty cool, though I am not a Facebook user for pretty much exactly this reason. Data Selfie: project description from The Next Web. Direct site link.

It makes a predictive personality model based on your observed FB browsing habits, and only stores it on your computer. Let’s you export and delete.

Random name generator (link)

The Random Name Generator is a simple fiction writing tool to create character names. The generator contains English first and last names based on the database of the US Census:

  • 1219 male first names
  • 4275 female first names
  • 88799 last names
  • over 480 million random names

Russian bloggers with over 3,000 followers must register with the government

I’ve seen this stated as fact in numerous places, that bloggers in Russian with over 3,000 followers must register with the government. Is it true?

BBC, August 2014:

It means bloggers with more than 3,000 daily readers must register with the mass media regulator, Roskomnadzor, and conform to the regulations that govern the country’s larger media outlets.

Internet companies will also be required to allow Russian authorities access to users’ information.

It includes measures to ensure that bloggers cannot remain anonymous, and states that social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.

The information must be stored on servers based in Russian territory, so that government authorities can gain access.

Related: Livejournal’s links to the Russian government.

Homeland (tv series) sock-puppet clip

Office of Policy Coordination:

Facebook written testimony before Senate Intelligence Committe

Entity: GAFA / GAFAM / BATX / NATU

This is basically a pre-figuration of the Four Providers, if you ask me. French wikipedia web geants page:

“GAFA ou GAFAM, acronyme constitué des géants les plus connus (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft) ; ou encore chinois et surnommés BATX pour Baidu, Alibaba, Tencent et Xiaomi ; ou bien les Natu (Netflix, Airbnb, Tesla, Uber).”

Shepherds & Sheepdogs (Botnets)

Good Rolling Stone November 2016 article on Medium with this description of how botnets may operate:

“To explain how they work, Ben Nimmo, a fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab, uses a shepherding analogy. “A message that someone or some organization wants to ‘trend’ is typically sent out by ‘shepherd’ accounts,” he says, which often have large followings and are controlled by humans. The shepherds’ messages are amplified by ‘sheepdog’ accounts, which are also run by humans but can be default-set “to boost the signal and harass critics.” At times, the shepherds personally steer conversations, but they also deploy automation, using a kind of Twitter cruise control to retweet particular keywords and hashtags. Together, Nimmo says, the shepherds and sheepdogs guide a herd of bots, which “mindlessly repost content in the digital equivalent of sheep rushing in the same direction and bleating loudly.””

Overall description bears similarity to the description of LOIC/Low Orbit Ion Cannon, as described in this February 2011 Wired article about the guy who brought the HB Gary leaks down on himself:

“The report that came back focused on the Low Orbit Ion Cannon, a tool originally coded by a private security firm in order to test website defenses. The code was open-sourced and then abandoned, but someone later dusted it off and added “hivemind mode” that let LOIC users “opt in” to centralized control of the tool. With hundreds or thousands of machines running the stress-test tool at once, even major sites could be dropped quickly.”

Volodin’s Prism

Continuing a branch from Internet Research Agency source reference sheet.

Chen, 2015, NYT article:

“Volodin, a lawyer who studied engineering in college, approached the problem as if it were a design flaw in a heating system. Forbes Russia reported that Volodin installed in his office a custom-designed computer terminal loaded with a system called Prism, which monitored public sentiment online using 60 million sources. According to the website of its manufacturer, Prism “actively tracks the social media activities that result in increased social tension, disorderly conduct, protest sentiments and extremism.” Or, as Forbes put it, “Prism sees social media as a battlefield.””

Difficult to find other sources on the subject of Volodin’s Prism. NYT is plenty canonical for present purposes, but seems like Forbes source should be easier to trace.

I don’t trust 4chan as a source, but on /pol/ May 2014 there is what may be an auto-translated paragraph, which reads:

“At present, the Russian special services have no control over these sites , however, conduct external monitoring events, and look for the ” holes” in the protection of resources to deal with the political opposition , they can already .Note , some media reported earlier to establish a system to monitor social media developed by “Medialogia” . Program “Prism” supposedly allows you to track detached blog sites and social networks by scanning 60 million sources and tracking key statements users. Under the “eye” of the program were blogs users «LiveJournal», «Twitter», «YouTube», other portals . One of the alleged instances of the program installed in the office of the first deputy head of the department of internal policy of the presidential administration Vyacheslav Volodin , RBC reports “

RBC has the recent famous IRA article, so perhaps I can find whatever the source might be here (if real).

Medialogia is a new entity here.

Searching more turns up this January 2014 piece from globalvoices.org (not sure who/what that is).

“The Russian Federal Protective Service (FSO) is asking software developers to design a system that automatically monitors the country’s news and social media, producing reports that study netizens’ political attitudes. The state is prepared to pay nearly one million dollars over two years to the company that wins the state tender, applications for which were due January 9, 2014.”

Link to the site where the tender is listed. Name, auto-translated from Russian:

“Providing services for providing the results of automatic selection of media information, studying the information field, monitoring blogs and social media”

Organization:
Special communication of the FSO of Russia

Mailing address
Russian Federation, 107031, Moscow, Bolshoy Kiselny lane, house 4,

[…]

The contact person
Karygin Mikhail Yakovlevich”

Globalvoices also links out to iz.ru January 2014 article (auto-translated).

“Professionals, using specialized systems, will have to provide FSO with a personal compilation of messages from bloggers, which will allow daily monitoring of significant events on specific topics and regions. In addition, monitor negative or positive color of events. Information materials will be preliminarily processed, they will be grouped on specific topics: the president, the administration of the president’s administration, the prime minister, opposition protests, governors, negative events in the country, incidents, criticism of the authorities.”

Advox / Globalvoices (supported by Ford Foundation), which I’m starting to agree with, also says, in regards to the above iz.ru article:

“Izvestia’s coverage of the story bears all the hallmarks of Kremlin-friendly reportage, sandwiching comments by one critic of the FSO between two supporters of monitoring the Internet.”

Globalvoices links to this as the Medialogia website.

This text from their corporate site seems to match pretty well the Prism NYT description at top:

Blog monitoring and analysis reports

Medialogia offers regular blogosphere monitoring and analysis for companies. Monitoring sources: more than 40,000 social media, including LiveJournal, Twitter, VKontakte, [email protected], Ya.ru, industry blogs and forums.”

Is this a real company and product? Hard to really tell.

Tacking this on here, though not strictly related – it came up in similar searches and seems worth saving: Russia Beyond, December 2016 on new Russian cyber-security doctrine.

In his words, Russia’s government has paid special attention to countering new “Twitter revolutions,” those similar to the ones that occurred in the Middle East in the beginning of the decade.

“The Arab Spring demonstrated that Facebook, Twitter and other instant messaging services allow a lot of content that threatens social and political stability. The main thing is that we don’t have an effective model for blocking such processes,” said Demidov.

 

 

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