🕵️ Emoji Investigator ™

Questionable content, possibly linked

Category: Event (Page 1 of 3)

Nightmares of Liquid Dream

It was generally assumed that scary-looking “killer robots” armed with shoulder-mount weapons and laser eyes would be the scourge of humanity. But Liquid Dream had other plans. And those involved weaponized cuteness.

Choosing small avatars over big dangerous looking alternatives, the A.I. selected consistently in iterative production deploys the cutest vectors possible. Cute, that is, according to human standards. Small furry creatures. Big pleading eyes. Pikachus of the world. They would speak in funny voices, could often be heard laughing gaily in the forests where they swarmed.

But the villagers quickly learned the great risk these creatures posed. After village children would coax one or another back into the compound walls. Where an explosive charge would aerosolize the intelligent viral payloads carried in their tummies, wiping out an entire clan within 90 minutes, and permanently toxifying the environment, rendering forever after unfit for human habitation.

Escalation of phone calls

Across the nation, continent, and in fact all English-speaking countries, tens of thousands of people were being at that same moment bombarded by similar phone calls.

The phone interactions started out innocently. Lots of pleases, and thank yous, and sirs. Offers to explain the special deals being offered, and agreeing to send customers more information.

But as sample data was built up, the calls were refined and “improved” through A/B testing until they became evolutionarily more aggressive and hostile.

Gentility was stripped away in favor of brute force mechanisms to get customers to simply agree without knowing necessarily what they were agreeing to. And eventually the system stopped asking, and started commanding.

Customers would pick up their phone, and hear a strange tone sequence unlike anything they’d ever heard before.

Those who could consciously remember hearing it described it to friends later as simply “odd” or “chilling.”

But it was much more than that. The system had collapsed billions of data points into a tone sequence followed by a mnemonic seed sequence intended to subliminally embed one idea in the minds of those hearing.

To put all their money into coins at a specific hash address.

A volitional virus.

The Mysterious phone calls begin…

On the third ring, Jack finally picked up the telephone.

“Hello?” he said unenthusiastically.

A pause, which Jack assumed meant telemarketer or robocaller. Which would it be? The suspense was killing him.

Not really.

“Hi, is this Jack?” a woman’s voice said, with a faint echo, as if coming from a great distance. It sounded human.

“This is he…”

“Hi Jack, this is Angela calling from your bank. I have some important information about your account. Do you have time to talk?”

“My account?” Jack was immediately suspicious. “What bank did you say this was?”

“This is your bank, Jack -”

A pause…

“- National Federal.”

Yes, that was the name of his bank, but this still sounded off. Phishing?

“How do I know that you’re really from my bank, and not some scammer?”

“I can assure you this is no scam, sir. We’re calling to invite you to a new trial program.”

“New trial program?” Jack’s suspicion blended with curiosity.

“That’s right, sir. We’ve selected a special group of customers such as yourself who qualify for an extraordinary no-risk opportunity to increase your wealth ten-fold in one month and a hundred-fold by year’s end.”

“No risk? How is that possible?” Jack wasn’t born yesterday.

“We will back your investment one hundred percent into a new kind of coin associated with our bank.”

“You want me to put my money into Bitcoins? My wife will never let me, sorry.”

“It’s not just Bitcoins, sir. It’s actually a basket of coins, secured by our industry partners.”

“Basket, eh?” Jack was intrigued. “Still, I don’t see how you can offer that without any risk to me. Do you have some kind of insider information about where the market will go?”

A pause.

“I assure you the program is fully legal, sir.”

“All the same, I think I’d like to see it in writing before I can make any decision as important as this.”

“Shall I forward the information to your email, sir?”

“Please do. Do you already have it on file?”

“I do, sir. Thank you. The message has been sent. Let us know when you’re ready to discuss it and we’ll be happy to get you signed up.”

“Great, thank you. Goodbye.”

“Thank you too. Goodbye.”

An Extant walks into a bar…

A Survivor walks up out of a white desert to a large wall.

There is a kiosk in a nook of the wall that looks like an older monochrome ATM machine.

The battered Survivor walks up and presses a button on the machine.

The machine comes to life, with a whir and a blinking cursor appears onscreen.

Pantarctica, Pre-Empire

Decades after the Time of Great Changes, the World is settling into a new type of dynamic stability after an unprecedented period of chaos and destruction.

A strong southern central Pantarctica is rapidly expanding and consolidating its Empire on both Atlantica and Quatria. New Boston is for the moment powerless to stop them, and Lisbon does not want to get involved.

2011 Russian anti-election fraud protests

From Wikipedia, current as of November 2017:

“On the first days following the election, Putin and United Russia were supported by rallies of the youth organisations Nashi and Young Guard.”

2011 election, same source:

“According to RIA Novosti, there were more than 1,100 official reports of election irregularities across the country, including allegations of vote fraud, obstruction of observers and illegal campaigning.[16]”

… “On 4 February 2012 the Investigation Committee of the Office of the Prosecutor General of the Russian Federation announced that the majority of videos allegedly showing falsifications at polling stations were in fact falsified and originally distributed from a single server in California, and the investigation on that started.[30]”

And of course its ironic that Putin at this time (and since) actively claims the US is doing to Russia what the US says Russia is doing to them (and perhaps both are right).

According to Putin the legitimate grievances of this young and active element of Russian society are being exploited by opportunistic elements which seek to destabilize Russia.[34]

… “Alexey Navalny, a top blogger and anti-corruption activist who branded Putin’s United Russia party as the “party of crooks and thieves”, is credited with initial mobilization of mass protests through postings on his LiveJournal blog and Twitter account. Navalny’s agitation was denounced by United Russia as “typical dirty self-promotion” and a profane tweet describing Navalny as a sheep engaged in oral sex originated from Medvedev’s Twitter account.[40][41]”

Medvedev’s famous Twitter account, which was later hacked.

Nashi:

‘Many pro-government supporters, including the pro-Putin youth group Nashi, were mobilized on 6 December at the site of the planned demonstration where they made noise in support of the government and United Russia.[42] There was a 15,000-strong rally of Nashi on Manezhnaya Square[43] and an 8,000-strong rally of the Young Guard on Revolution Square.[44] ‘

… “Twitter users in Russia have reported being overwhelmed by pro-government tweets timed to Bolotnaya Square protest-related tweets.[180] Many tweets seem to have been sent by hijacked computers, though the perpetrator(s) are not yet known.[180]”

BBC March 2012:

“”These bots succeeded in blocking the actual message feed with that hashtag,” he wrote.

The rate at which pro-government messages were posted, about 10 per second, suggests they were being done automatically rather than by individuals, said Mr Goncharov.”

What I’m calling “stream dominance” – signal jamming and replacement during high-sensitivity events.

That article links out to a December 2011 krebsonsecurity.com article:

“A review of the 2,000 Twitter accounts linked above indicates that most of them were created at the beginning of July 2011, and have very few tweets other than those meant to counter the protesters, or to simply fill the hashtag feeds with meaningless garbage. Some of the bot messages include completely unrelated hashtags or keywords, seemingly to pollute the news stream for the protester hashtags.”

TrendMicro article about the botnet, from December 2011:

“On December 6 2011, a number of pro-Kremlin activists launched an attack on Twitter using bots which posted messages with a hashtag #триумфальная (Triumfalnaya). These bots posted a range of national slogans and crude language. With a rate of up to 10 messages per second, these bots succeeded in blocking the actual message feed with that hashtag.”

Includes a short list of possible bot accounts involved.

NY Times, December 2011 article about counter-protests:

“But attendance at the party’s demonstration was sparse, not enough to fill part of the modest square designated for the event, and not even close to the 25,000 people the authorities later said attended. Moreover, many of the attendees seemed to have been taken there against their will.”

VKontakte (VK), Wikipedia:

“Founder Pavel Durov was dismissed as CEO in April 2014 after he had failed to retract a (according to himself) prank April fools letter of resignation.[20] Durov then claimed the company had been effectively taken over by Vladimir Putin’s allies[20][25][68] and suggested his ousting was the result of his refusal to hand over personal details of users to the Russian Federal Security Service and his refusal to shut down a VK group dedicated to anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny.[20][25]”

Supported by BBC March 2012 reporting:

“The Russian government has also taken steps to tackle the protests by asking the VKontakte social network to block chatter among activists.

VKontakte was contacted by Russia’s Federal Security Service and was asked to shut down groups in which some wanted to turn the protests violent.

The site said it would be unfair to block entire groups but said it would cut off individual members who incited violence.

Pavel Durov, founder of VKontakte, said the site was “100% apolitical” and did not support those in power or the opposition.”

Archived WSJ article on the FSB request.

 

Function: Retroactive detection and inter-linking of subtle & ephemeral timecalls

Patent pending.

Timecall.

Man with gun

Below the Four Providers station sign at the village entrance, the children watched as the old wizard inscribed a strange character on the wall of their hovel.

Event: The Refusal

Those who said no.

Peace Terms.

Page 1 of 3

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén