Tim Boucher

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Sentimental ballad (Musicology)

Sentimental ballads had their origins in the early Tin Pan Alley music industry of the later 19th century.[5] Initially known as “tear-jerkers” or “drawing-room ballads”, they were generally sentimental, narrative, strophic songs published separately or as part of an opera, descendants perhaps of broadside ballads. As new genres of music began to emerge in the early 20th century, their popularity faded, but the association with sentimentality led to the term ballad being used for a slow love song from the 1950s onwards.[6]

Source: Sentimental ballad – Wikipedia

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  1. Tim B.

    “Sentimental ballads have their roots from medieval French chanson balladée or ballade, which were originally “danced songs”. Ballads were particularly characteristic of the popular poetry and song of the British Isles from the later medieval period until the 19th century. They were widely used across Europe, and later in the Americas, Australia and North Africa.[7][8][9] As a narrative song, their theme and function may originate from Scandinavian and Germanic traditions of storytelling.[10] Musically they were influenced by the Minnesinger.[11] The earliest example of a recognizable ballad in form in England is “Judas” in a 13th-century manuscript.[12]”

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