September 2017, Alex Stamos, official Facebook post:

“In reviewing the ads buys, we have found approximately $100,000 in ad spending from June of 2015 to May of 2017 — associated with roughly 3,000 ads — that was connected to about 470 inauthentic accounts and Pages in violation of our policies. Our analysis suggests these accounts and Pages were affiliated with one another and likely operated out of Russia.”

CNBC October 2017, tries to link 200 Twitter accounts to those 470 FB:

“Some of those same suspicious accounts on Facebook, however, also have ties to another 200 accounts on Twitter, a realization it shared with congressional investigators last week.”

Recode September 2017:

“Beyond publishing its findings, Facebook shared more granular details with its peers — standard practice for many tech giants, which generally band together to address online threats, such as hackers. With the aid of that information, Twitter discovered about 200 Kremlin-aligned accounts directly tied to some of the profiles Facebook previously identified. None of those suspicious Twitter accounts had purchased sponsored tweets, the company told lawmakers.”

So what are the full 470 items on FB’s suspended list? Twitter released their 2,700~ list already.

Many outlets are reporting today, including this Bloomberg November 2017 post, that Facebook will allow some users to see if they directly followed malicious accounts linked to the Internet Research Agency:

“The tool will appear by the end of the year in Facebook’s online support center, the company said in a blog post Wednesday. It will answer the user question, “How can I see if I’ve liked or followed a Facebook page or Instagram account created by the Internet Research Agency?” That’s the Russian firm that created thousands of incendiary posts from fake accounts posing as U.S. citizens. People will see a list of the accounts they followed, if any, from January 2015 through August 2017.”

Sounds like that list is maybe not yet available publicly at this time. I wrote to Library of Congress to see if it’s already been entered into the public record. Maybe they can help…